That Seal Was Real

August 3, 2012 5:03 pm November 1, 2011 8:35 pm

Just so we understand:

stfuconservatives:

inothernews:

  • Netflix pulls dickish move, raises rate for popular service by like 60%;
  • Netflix pisses off, and loses hundreds of thousands of customers as a result;
  • Netflix relents somewhat.
  • Bank Of America pulls dickish move, threatens to impose monthly fees for use of debit cards;
  • Bank Of America pisses off, loses thousands of customers as a result;
  • Bank Of America cancels plans for debit card monthly charge.

People are much more perceptive to corporate dickishness these days. The internet makes it very easy for us all to voice our frustration in one collective shout.

So major corporations, stop being dicks!

-Joe

(via stfuconservatives)

August 12, 2011 8:00 am

shortformblog:

Questionable phrase of the day: Mitt Romney, facing a tough crowd in Iowa, says the words “Corporations are people, my friend.” This will be used against him for the next year and a half, guys.

Only the fact that neither he not Bachmann will ever make it to the White House gives me any hope for the future.

(via stfuconservatives)

August 3, 2011 7:26 pm
whiporwill:

How Big Business Subverts Democracy: Leaks from Anonymous hackers show how far corporate America will go to smear critics of the Chamber of Commerce

Just a couple of years ago, most people had no idea what the Chamber of Commerce did. Aren’t they mom and pop’s small-business lobby in Washington? Now, thanks in large part to the work of Chamber opponents, we’ve come to learn that the biggest business lobby in the world is also one of the biggest impediments to real democracy in the US, and that they’re a huge force in opposing healthcare reform, employee free choice and other labour legislation, veterans’ rights, banking regulations and, of course, transparency.
The US Chamber of Commerce is the public face of a corporatism that is hijacking our democracy – and so dramatically limits any chances of meaningful reform. Even local chambers, fed up, have been leaving the US Chamber en masse. But what might it take for the “Facebook generation” in the US to topple, Tunisia- or Egypt-style, this arrogant and destructive force in American politics?
The spectacular series of leaks, counter-leaks and counter-counter-leaks revealed (and continues revealing) a disdain for free speech that shocked even us. It turns out that a consortium of private “cyber-security” firms were developing a $2m proposal to use a variety of sophisticated disinformation techniques to destroy the reputations of Chamber opponents, including public-interest, consumer-advocate and worker-rights groups such as US Chamber Watch and Change to Win. (The same firm was reportedly also proposing, in a presentation for Bank of America, a plot to destroy WikiLeaks, and to “neutralise” constitutional scholar Glenn Greenwald of Salon.com.) Like the Chamber of Commerce, Bank of America has denied knowledge of these plans.
More specifically, the firm proposed to (according to a leaked document) “create a false document, perhaps highlighting periodical financial information, and monitor to see if US Chamber Watch acquires it”. To help make this happen, they’d “create a fake insider persona and generate communications” with Change to Win, a labour group the firm theorised might be allied to Chamber Watch. Maybe they’d even “create two fake insider personas, using one as leverage to discredit the other while confirming the legitimacy of the second”. But it didn’t stop there: the security firms proposed passing off the faked documents they’d created as the fabrication of Change to Win.


Remember how I just explained that big business and corporations can’t be trusted? If you don’t believe me, there must be a hole in your brain.

whiporwill:

How Big Business Subverts Democracy: Leaks from Anonymous hackers show how far corporate America will go to smear critics of the Chamber of Commerce

Just a couple of years ago, most people had no idea what the Chamber of Commerce did. Aren’t they mom and pop’s small-business lobby in Washington? Now, thanks in large part to the work of Chamber opponents, we’ve come to learn that the biggest business lobby in the world is also one of the biggest impediments to real democracy in the US, and that they’re a huge force in opposing healthcare reform, employee free choice and other labour legislation, veterans’ rights, banking regulations and, of course, transparency.

The US Chamber of Commerce is the public face of a corporatism that is hijacking our democracy – and so dramatically limits any chances of meaningful reform. Even local chambers, fed up, have been leaving the US Chamber en masse. But what might it take for the “Facebook generation” in the US to topple, Tunisia- or Egypt-style, this arrogant and destructive force in American politics?

The spectacular series of leaks, counter-leaks and counter-counter-leaks revealed (and continues revealing) a disdain for free speech that shocked even us. It turns out that a consortium of private “cyber-security” firms were developing a $2m proposal to use a variety of sophisticated disinformation techniques to destroy the reputations of Chamber opponents, including public-interest, consumer-advocate and worker-rights groups such as US Chamber Watch and Change to Win. (The same firm was reportedly also proposing, in a presentation for Bank of America, a plot to destroy WikiLeaks, and to “neutralise” constitutional scholar Glenn Greenwald of Salon.com.) Like the Chamber of Commerce, Bank of America has denied knowledge of these plans.

More specifically, the firm proposed to (according to a leaked document) “create a false document, perhaps highlighting periodical financial information, and monitor to see if US Chamber Watch acquires it”. To help make this happen, they’d “create a fake insider persona and generate communications” with Change to Win, a labour group the firm theorised might be allied to Chamber Watch. Maybe they’d even “create two fake insider personas, using one as leverage to discredit the other while confirming the legitimacy of the second”. But it didn’t stop there: the security firms proposed passing off the faked documents they’d created as the fabrication of Change to Win.

Remember how I just explained that big business and corporations can’t be trusted? If you don’t believe me, there must be a hole in your brain.

(via whipporwill-deactivated20111220)

July 27, 2011 6:52 am
"The madness that is the proposed tax repatriation holiday is continuing and gathering steam. More and more members of congress are coming out of the woodwork, scratching their chins in contemplative consideration as it were, pretending that they’ve just realized what a great day a corporate tax holiday would be – not that they’ve taken gazillions of dollars from the firms lobbying for it or anything."

Evil Corporate Tax Holiday Gains Bipartisan Support | Rolling Stone Politics | Taibblog | Matt Taibbi on Politics and the Economy

This is extremely upsetting.

(via robot-heart-politics)

And there are still people who don’t believe big business owns our government.

(via stfuconservatives)

July 23, 2011 8:56 am
whiporwill:

In 100 degree weather, powerful heat lamps (normally used to melt snow on sidewalks) were shined on a Hyatt Hotel picket line. The heat lamps were turned off when the press showed up

The Park Hyatt at 800 N. Michigan Ave. was among the hotels where picketing was held, and at some point Thursday morning, someone turned on the outdoor heat lamps that are usually used in winter.
Combined with the outdoor air temperature, Linda Long says it was hotter than the Hyatt kitchen she’s worked in for eleven years.
“They put the heat lamps on us, like we were nothing,” Long said. “If the heat didn’t kill us, the heat lamps would.”
The heat lamps were turned off when the press showed up.
Gabriel Carrasquillo has been a server at Nomi Restaurant the Hyatt for five years. He says this is about subcontracting and farming out their jobs to cheaper workers.
“They’re telling us they’re meeting our needs for health insurance and salaries, but if we don’t have a job, it doesn’t matter how much they’re paying,” Carrasquillo said. “That’s why we’re still fighting.”
The union says the Boston Hyatt replaced 100 housekeepers with temps making minimum wage. That, they say, is what they’re fighting.

For those who don’t know: this kind of thing happens all the time. That is why comparing the political strength of labor unions to corporations is a red herring. Every small advance in respecting the human dignity of those without much individual power has to be won by fighting tooth and nail against businesses whose profit motive treats people as expendable. Labor unions are a vital check on the inherent incentive of business to grind down wages and working conditions, but they are also a vital check on the influence of business over the political process. And today, labor unions (particularly in the private sector) are on the brink of extinction.

whiporwill:

In 100 degree weather, powerful heat lamps (normally used to melt snow on sidewalks) were shined on a Hyatt Hotel picket line. The heat lamps were turned off when the press showed up

The Park Hyatt at 800 N. Michigan Ave. was among the hotels where picketing was held, and at some point Thursday morning, someone turned on the outdoor heat lamps that are usually used in winter.

Combined with the outdoor air temperature, Linda Long says it was hotter than the Hyatt kitchen she’s worked in for eleven years.

“They put the heat lamps on us, like we were nothing,” Long said. “If the heat didn’t kill us, the heat lamps would.”

The heat lamps were turned off when the press showed up.

Gabriel Carrasquillo has been a server at Nomi Restaurant the Hyatt for five years. He says this is about subcontracting and farming out their jobs to cheaper workers.

“They’re telling us they’re meeting our needs for health insurance and salaries, but if we don’t have a job, it doesn’t matter how much they’re paying,” Carrasquillo said. “That’s why we’re still fighting.”

The union says the Boston Hyatt replaced 100 housekeepers with temps making minimum wage. That, they say, is what they’re fighting.

For those who don’t know: this kind of thing happens all the time. That is why comparing the political strength of labor unions to corporations is a red herring. Every small advance in respecting the human dignity of those without much individual power has to be won by fighting tooth and nail against businesses whose profit motive treats people as expendable. Labor unions are a vital check on the inherent incentive of business to grind down wages and working conditions, but they are also a vital check on the influence of business over the political process. And today, labor unions (particularly in the private sector) are on the brink of extinction.

(via whipporwill-deactivated20111220)