That Seal Was Real

January 24, 2013 3:00 am
stoneagechronicles:

republicanidiots:

ch

Now it’s up to Kentucky to make 2014 Mitch McConnell’s last year as a Senator.

stoneagechronicles:

republicanidiots:

ch

Now it’s up to Kentucky to make 2014 Mitch McConnell’s last year as a Senator.

(Source: eatbloganddie)

November 10, 2012 7:13 pm

hgssethan:

November 8, 2012

Florida has yet to submit their electoral votes

But see.. this was the plan all along. Florida never submits their electoral votes.

This election never actually ends

Obama remains in office for the next 25 years until he dies. His two daughters joint take over. The United States of America becomes the United States of Obama. The south secedes.

November 4, 2012 7:09 pm
stoneagechronicles:

Rising star in (what else?) the Republican Party, once a shoo-in for the Delaware State Senate, arrested on 113 counts of child sex abuse
He even had the endorsement of a certain God-fearin’ conservative named Christine O’Donnell:

Bodenweiser defeated incumbent Republican Sen. Joe Booth in the September primary to become the GOP nominee for the 19th Senate District on the strength of social conservative support, and quickly got a heartfelt endorsement from former U.S. Senate candidate Christine O’Donnell.
In a video posted by the Sussex Countian from the night she appeared at a fundraiser for Bodenweiser, O’Donnell called him a “great man that deserves our support and that we need to send to Dover. Eric has the kind of character that will stand up against corruption, that will do what is right in the face of opposition, in the face of pressure.”
O’Donnell could not be reached for comment Monday evening.

stoneagechronicles:

Rising star in (what else?) the Republican Party, once a shoo-in for the Delaware State Senate, arrested on 113 counts of child sex abuse

He even had the endorsement of a certain God-fearin’ conservative named Christine O’Donnell:

Bodenweiser defeated incumbent Republican Sen. Joe Booth in the September primary to become the GOP nominee for the 19th Senate District on the strength of social conservative support, and quickly got a heartfelt endorsement from former U.S. Senate candidate Christine O’Donnell.

In a video posted by the Sussex Countian from the night she appeared at a fundraiser for Bodenweiser, O’Donnell called him a “great man that deserves our support and that we need to send to Dover. Eric has the kind of character that will stand up against corruption, that will do what is right in the face of opposition, in the face of pressure.”

O’Donnell could not be reached for comment Monday evening.

November 3, 2012 9:36 am
"Now communism, and I hate to bring the c-word into this, is the government owning the means of production. And that’s what we see with the schools, with public education and the government. I think we need to bring private competition into it."

Wyoming Country Party nominee for the U.S. Senate, Joel Otto, at tonight’s PBS debate regarding public schools.  

(via cognitivedissonance)

Communism … they keep using that word …

(via stoneagechronicles)

(via stoneagechronicles)

November 2, 2012 12:29 pm October 8, 2012 4:07 pm

jonnyjabberwockey:

I honestly can’t understand how any woman in her right mind can support Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan.

Don’t you mean any person? Anywhere? Ever?

September 16, 2012 11:29 am
Kansas Goes Birther: State Board Considers Removing Obama From Ballot

cognitivedissonance:

Goddammit, Kansas:

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, an informal advisor to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, said on Thursday he and his fellow members of a state board were considering removing President Barack Obama from the Kansas ballot this November.

Kobach is part of the State Objections Board along with Attorney General Derek Schmidt and Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer, all Republicans. The Topeka Capital-Journal reported that on Thursday the board agreed consider whether to take Obama off the ballot because they said they lacked sufficient evidence about his birth certificate.

Go hang out with Arizona Secretary of State Ken Bennett, bros. Obama’s birth certificate is online, and it’s even printed on a handy mug that you guys could keep in the office. Every time you sip your coffee, you can be reminded just how backwards your theories truly are.

Otherwise, kindly GTFO. 

(via stoneagechronicles)

September 8, 2012 4:45 am
"We share responsibility for creating an economy where parents with jobs earn enough to care for their families."

Sister Simone Campbell (via current)

SING IT SISTER

(via stfuconservatives)

(via stfuconservatives)

September 6, 2012 6:14 pm

The Most Important Political News This Week

robertreich:

The biggest political news this week won’t be the Democratic convention. It will be Friday’s unemployment report.

If the trend is good — if the rate of unemployment drops and the number of payroll jobs is as good if not better than it was in July — President Obama’s claim we’re on the right track gains crucial credibility. But if these numbers are moving in the wrong direction, Romney’s claim the nation needs a new start may appear more credible. 


I don’t recall a time when these jobs numbers, compiled monthly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (a highly professional group whose findings are completely insulated from politics), were as politically significant as they’ll be this Friday, and the first Fridays in October and November. 
Yet these numbers are really crude approximations. They’re adjusted for seasonal variations — based on historical data that may have less significance today, when the economy is still struggling to emerge from the worst downturn since the Great Depression. The numbers are also subject to corrections and revisions later, as more data come in. 
But perhaps the biggest flaw — and irony — is that when and if jobs really do start to return, many of the people who had been too discouraged to look for work start looking again. And when more people are looking, the rate of unemployment rises — because that rate is based on the percent of Americans actively looking for work. Those who have stopped looking aren’t counted.
August 19, 2012 11:29 am
Romney Tax Plan on Table. Debt Collapses Table.

The non-partisan Tax Policy Center has declared Mitt Romney’s tax policy promises, “Mathematically Impossible.”

From Bloomerberg.com:

I can describe Mitt Romney’s tax policy promises in two words: mathematically impossible.

Those aren’t my words. They’re the words of the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, which has conducted the most comprehensive analysis to date of Romney’s tax plan and which bent over backward to make his promises add up. They’re perhaps the two most important words that have been written during this U.S. presidential election.

If you were to distill the presumptive Republican nominee’s campaign to a few sentences, you could hardly do better than this statement of purpose from the speech Romney delivered in Detroit, outlining his plan for the economy: “I believe the American people are ready for real leadership. I believe they deserve a bold, conservative plan for reform and economic growth. Unlike President Obama, I actually have one — and I’m not afraid to put it on the table.”

The truth is that Romney is afraid to put his plan on the table. He has promised to reduce the deficit, but refused to identify the spending he would cut. He has promised to reform the tax code, but refused to identify the deductions and loopholes he would eliminate. The only thing he has put on the table is dessert: a promise to cut marginal tax rates by 20 percent across the board and to do so without raising the deficit or reducing the taxes paid by the top 1 percent.

The Tax Policy Center took Romney at his word. They also did what he hasn’t done: They put his plan on the table.

To help Romney, the center did so under the most favorable conditions, which also happen to be wildly unrealistic. The analysts assumed that any cuts to deductions or loopholes would begin with top earners, and that no one earning less than $200,000 would have their deductions reduced until all those earning more than $200,000 had lost all of their deductions and tax preferences first. They assumed, as Romney has promised, that the reforms would spare the portions of the tax code that privilege saving and investment. They even ran a simulation in which they used a model developed, in part, by Greg Mankiw, one of Romney’s economic advisers, that posits “implausibly large growth effects” from tax cuts.

The numbers never worked out. No matter how hard the Tax Policy Center labored to make Romney’s promises add up, every simulation ended the same way: with a tax increase on the middle class. The tax cuts Romney is offering to the rich are simply larger than the size of the (non-investment) deductions and loopholes that exist for the rich. That’s why it’s “mathematically impossible” for Romney’s plan to produce anything but a tax increase on the middle class.

The Romney campaign offered two responses to the Tax Policy Center’s analysis, one more misleading than the other.

First, the campaign called the analysis “just another biased study from a former Obama staffer.” That jab refers to Adam Looney, one of the study’s three co-authors, who served in a staff role on the White House Council of Economic Advisers under President Barack Obama. But the Tax Policy Center is directed by Donald Marron, who was one of the principals on George W. Bush’s Council of Economic Advisers. Calling the Tax Policy Center biased simply isn’t credible — a point underscored by the fact that the Romney campaign referred to the group’s work as “objective, third-party analysis” during the primary campaign.

Then the Romney campaign said, “The study ignores the positive benefits to economic growth from both the corporate tax plan and the deficit reduction called for in the Romney plan.” There’s a reason the study ignores those “positive benefits”: Romney has called for a revenue-neutral corporate tax plan that brings the rate down from 35 percent to 25 percent while also promising to balance the budget. He has not said how he will achieve either goal. Until he does, those positive benefits — if they exist — are impossible to calculate.

If Romney tries to pay for his tax cuts by reducing spending, the results, as the Tax Policy Center notes, would be even more regressive. Romney has promised to increase defense spending and hold benefits steady for the current generation of seniors. The only remaining big spending programs are those that help the poor; that’s where Romney’s cuts would have to be concentrated. Paying for tax cuts for the rich by curtailing programs for the poor is even more of a reverse-Robin Hood act than paying for tax cuts for the rich by cutting the tax expenditures (deductions and the like) of the middle class.

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities produced its own analysis of Romney’s plan, based on an assumption that Romney pays for half of his tax cuts through spending cuts. The conclusion: By 2022, Romney would need to cut all non-defense, non-Social Security programs by 49 percent. That is not plausible, to say the least.

The Romney campaign has not provided good answers to the questions raised by its own math. But we already knew the Romney campaign didn’t have good answers. If Romney had good answers, he would have made good on his rhetoric and put his plans on the table.

It would be great if Romney could fulfill his promise to cut taxes by trillions of dollars, increase defense spending, keep entitlement spending on pretty much its current path for the next decade, and balance the budget. But as Tyler Cowen, the George Mason University economist, put it in a pithy tweet (though perhaps “pithy tweet” is a tautology), “The proposed Romney fiscal policy just doesn’t make any sense.”

This is not a surprise. Even some Republican policy experts admit in private that Romney’s promises simply don’t add up. To twist Abraham Lincoln’s famous formulation, the Romney campaign has decided it’s better to remain silent and be thought evasive than to reveal your plan and remove all doubt that you’re cutting taxes on the rich while increasing the deficit, raising taxes on the middle class and cutting programs for the poor.

Unfortunately for the Romney campaign, the Tax Policy Center’s analysis has removed all doubt. Romney needs to come up with a way to make his promises mathematically possible — and quick.

The Tax Policy Center has done the math to prove what everyone already knew. Mitt Romney’s tax plan is just a repeat of Bush and Ryan. Screw over everyone to benefit the top one percent.

August 11, 2012 2:46 am

R-Money is going to announce his VP choice in Virginia at 9am.

According to nearly every new outlet on the internet, Romney is going to pick Wisconsin Representative Paul Ryan. Yes, that Paul Ryan. The chair of the House Budget Committee and author of the notorious “Ryan Budget,” officially called The Path to Prosperity: A Blueprint for American Renewal. This budget plan would cap government spending at $1.029 trillion dollars, dismantle the Affordable Care Act, and cut federal spending on almost everything other than defence. This includes privatizing Medicare. The Ryan Budget has been criticized by Democrats because it would negatively impact the middle class, senior citizens, and lower-income Americans, the Center for American Progress, has argued that the plan would have a negative impact on all but the top 1% and that it “especially hurts communities of color,” and President Obama called it “thinly veiled social Darwinism.”

Ryan, at 42, is young compared to Mitt Romney’s 65 and would give his campaign a more youthful face. He is also well respected among Republican politicians, likely pulling in some of the support Romney has been lacking from his own party.

The bottom line is, Ryan is likely to be confirmed as Romney’s running mate in just over six hours. Republicans like him, Democrats don’t. He will likely shore up support from Romney’s base, but is unlikely to draw any centre or left-leaning voters to Romney’s side.

July 18, 2012 11:56 am June 30, 2012 6:26 pm June 25, 2012 8:37 am
nonplussedbyreligion:

robrogers:

Primary Mitt - 21 Jun 2012

I cannot say often enough how the prospect of a President Romney scares the living shit out of me.  This is huge because I’m not easily scared having survived living in Florida for both G.W. Bush elections, and Arizona for McCain. 

nonplussedbyreligion:

robrogers:

Primary Mitt - 21 Jun 2012

I cannot say often enough how the prospect of a President Romney scares the living shit out of me.  This is huge because I’m not easily scared having survived living in Florida for both G.W. Bush elections, and Arizona for McCain. 

(via nonplussedbyreligion-deactivate)

June 16, 2012 11:59 am
"Universal suffrage, the right to vote, is never safe, never secure, never complete. This election season will be one where money from a few will have enormous influence, while the votes of many are being eliminated, their voices effectively silenced. Unless people fight to dramatically expand voter participation, not just prevent the purges, our democracy is in serious danger."